As random holidays go, Learn About Butterflies Day has to be one of the best. It’s originator appears unknown, but they probably had a sense of appreciation for simple yet fascinating things from which there is much to learn.

Butterflies come around during the summer months, yet the holiday is always March 14. HolidayInsights.com suggest there’s logic to this: People become busy with outdoor activities in the summer. So, it’s far better to spend time learning now in order to better appreciate these colorful winged creatures when they reappear.

How to celebrate Learn About Butterflies Day

There are plenty of ideas across the web for how to celebrate Learn About Butterflies Day with children of all ages. Here are a few:

1. Study the wide range of butterflies through an online guide or identification book from a store or library to learn which butterflies inhabit your yard and how to attract them.

2. Consider entering this digital scrapbooking contest by submitting butterfly-themed pages, whether a design element or photos.

3. Print out some coloring pages and explore facts and photos about the life stages of a butterfly.

4. Check out Butterfly Conservation, a British organization formed by a small group of dedicated naturalists in 1968 following the alarming decline of many beautiful butterflies. A symposium in April will include the latest science on how to reverse the decline of butterflies and moths, and conserve their habitats.

5. Make a craft involving butterflies, sing about them, or do something else fun from this list of ideas.

6. Visit an indoor butterfly exhibit, such as the Butterfly Pavilion at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History in Washington, DC. Here, you can take a stroll among live butterflies and exotic plants.

7. Plan a garden to attract butterflies to your yard, beginning with researching the flowers that they like.

8. Explore K12‘s third-grade science activity in which students explore three distinct environments within a botanical garden. In each section, they learn how plants have adapted to survive and thrive. Which habitat(s) would butterflies would live in?

Feel free to share an idea of your own with us by posting a comment below.

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About The Author

Deanna Glick
Senior Writer & Editor
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Deanna Glick is Senior Editor of Learning Liftoff. She has spent two decades as a writer and editor, covering education policy, adoption, and other issues of interest to children and families. Deanna has also worked and volunteered for youth-focused nonprofits, including Students Run LA and the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. A California native, Deanna loves to hike sections of the Appalachian Trail and spend time on the Shenandoah River near her northern Virginia home. She often finds writing inspiration through her 8-year-old daughter, who loves to read, paint, play sports and learn.